Exodus


Exodus
The book of Exodus is sometimes viewed with scepticism—but need not be.

Exodus for Ordinary People by Paul Poulton

The stories it contains record a turning point in history where God begins to relate to human beings in a new way, and a nation takes its first faltering steps. A reluctant hero is chosen to lead a group of people who are not sure they want to be led at all. We can see ourselves reflected in the strains of the people in conflict with a major power of their day, and sometimes with each other.

This second book of the Bible yields much that may go unnoticed by a cursory reading. There are lessons to learn, and an absorbing scene to watch—the gritty life of Jacob's descendants played out in the arena of ancient Lower Egypt. On close inspection we are able to figure out which pharaoh is in power, why Moses is sent to tend sheep in the wilderness, how Aaron acquired his metallurgy skills—and why he used them to cast a golden calf.

Exodus for Ordinary People highlights many events that may have puzzled us when we've read the book of Exodus before, but the answers are there if we look.